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Historic Landmark Preservation Commission: Charles W. McCrary House

Charles W. McCrary House front (facing north)

Charles W. McCrary House

Charles W. McCrary House fron entrance detail

Charles W. McCrary House, northwest view

Charles W. McCrary House, west side

Charles W. McCrary House, rear (south) side

Charles W. McCrary House back entrance detail

Charles W. McCrary House back porch detail

Charles W. McCrary House northeast view

Charles W. McCrary House outbuilding

Charles W. McCrary House outbuilding

Charles W. McCrary House, foyer

Charles W. McCrary House staircase detail

Charles W. McCrary House, second floor landing

Charles W. McCrary House interior detail

Charles W. McCrary House interior detail

Charles W. McCrary House interior detail

Charles W. McCrary House interior detail

Charles W. McCrary House interior detail

Charles W. McCrary House interior detail

Charles W. McCrary House interior detail

Charles W. McCrary House interior detail

Charles W. McCrary Sr.

Read the Landmark Designation Report

Read the Landmark Designation Resolution

The house was built by Charles Walker McCrary Sr., the oldest son of textile industrialist Doctor Bulla (D.B.) McCrary on the corner lot east of his father's home. The house is located on the previous home site of Jonathan Worth, who served as governor of North Carolina. Architect Harry Barton provided the plans for this imposing Classical Revival style house. In features such as the entrance bay and Palladian window framed by Ionic pilasters, the stucco walls and green-tiled roof, Barton's design drew on the academic style of the Italian Renaissance. Yet the rectangular mass of the dwelling with its end chimneys and central gable articulating the entrance is typical of the vernacular house type dominant throughout the nineteenth century southern United States. This Classical Revival architectural style was popular among the well-to-do during the 1920s and 1930s, and some elements of the McCrary house - stucco, green tile and sunrooms, for example, relate the house to dwellings such as the Reynolda House in Winston-Salem. 

Related Sites:

J. Frank McCrary House